Anti-Bullying

At St. John's, we say NO to bullying!

As the message clearly says, at St. John's we say NO to any form of bullying here at St. John's.

We are very proud of the fact that we are an inclusive school for all and that we value the things that make us different. However, sometimes it can be very difficult to tell the differnece between 'bullying' and 'bad behaviour'. We are all human beings and we all make mistakes and do the wrong thing. We've no doubts that if you asked yourself the self-reflecting question, 'Have I ever said or done anything, intentionally or unitentionally, that has hurt another person?' Then we're pretty sure that we would all say yes.

So, what makes a person a bully?

Although there is no legal definition of what bullying is, St. John’s CE Primary School has adopted the following collaborative definition of bullying from the Anti-Bullying Alliance. This is our shared understanding of what bullying is:

The repetitive, intentional hurting of one person or group by another person or group, where the relationship involves an imbalance of power. Bullying can be physical, verbal or psychological. It can happen face-to-face or through cyberspace.

What do we do here at St. John's to reduce the risk of bullying occuring?

  • We are a positive school. We believe that recognising achievement, celebrating the good and praising the positive is the best way to reduce the risk of bullying occuring.
  • Where allegations of bullying are made, the school will speak with the victim, the alleged perpertrator(s) and seek to establish the truth.
  • We will follow the school's Behaviour Policy when applying any sanctions, which are appropriate and proportionate to the bullying action.
  • We will support the victim to deal with their worries, their anxieties and their fears.
  • We will work with the perpetrator to rectify and put right their bullying behaviour through education and support.
  • We will work with the parents of both the victim and perpetrator and offer them advice and support as to how they can help their children.

What should you do if your child is being bullied?

  • There is only one thing that we encourage a child to do... and that is to talk to an adult they trust and know.
  • The victim can often find it hard to speak out because of the fear of repercussion from the bully. Creating a safe and non-threatening environment for a child to feel comfortable in will help them to open up and tell you what has been happening.
  • Do not get angry, do not get upset. This can be easier said than done... but keeping calm and collected will reassure your child.
  • Comfort your child... a very simple thing to do, but is probably the best medicine for a child being bullied.
  • And finally, contact the school and speak with the Headteacher. Keep calm, keep collected and work with the school to resolve the situation.

For further advice and guidance, please click on the website links below.

   

      

Or alternatively, you can download these helpful anti-bullying guides for parents and for children, produced by the Anti-Bullying alliance for Anti Bullying week 2014.

 

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